damn dog…

Nybo’s Salad Dressing Recipe

Roger Austin Nybos Salad Dressing
1. 4 Eggs ( I use pasteurized)
2. 1 Cup of Sugar ( I use Splenda)
3. 1 tsp of salt
4. 1 ½ tsp of Paprika
5. 1 Cup of Tomato Paste
6. 8 Table spoon of White Vinegar
7. 4 Cups of Salad Oil ( I use Canola)
8. ½ tsp of Garlic Powder

Beat 15 to 25 Min. with electric mixer .
Put in a jar and cover, and refrigerate.

Science Matters – Trading water for fuel is fracking crazy

David Suzuki Foundation

Trading water for fuel is fracking crazy

drought
Photo Credit: Merinda Brayfield

It would be difficult to live without oil and gas. But it would be impossible to live without water. Yet, in our mad rush to extract and sell every drop of gas and oil as quickly as possible, we’re trading precious water for fossil fuels.

A recent report, “Hydraulic Fracturing and Water Stress”,shows the severity of the problem. Alberta and B.C. are among eight North American regions examined in the study by Ceres, a U.S.-based nonprofit advocating for sustainability leadership.

One of the most disturbing findings is that hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is using enormous amounts of water in areas that can scarcely afford it. The report notes that close to half the oil and gas wells recently fracked in the U.S. “are in regions with high or extremely high water stress” and more than 55 per cent are in areas experiencing drought. In Colorado and California, almost all wells – 97 and 96 per cent, respectively – are in regions with high or extremely high water stress, meaning more than 80 per cent of available surface and groundwater has already been allocated for municipalities, industry and agriculture. A quarter of Alberta wells are in areas with medium to high water stress.

Drought and fracking have already caused some small communities in Texas to run out of water altogether, and parts of California are headed for the same fate. As we continue to extract and burn ever greater amounts of oil, gas and coal, climate change is getting worse, which will likely lead to more droughts in some areas and flooding in others. California’s drought may be the worst in 500 years, according to B. Lynn Ingram, an earth and planetary sciences professor at the University of California, Berkeley. That’s causing a shortage of water for drinking and agriculture, and for salmon and other fish that spawn in streams and rivers. With no rain to scrub the air, pollution in the Los Angeles area has returned to dangerous levels of decades past.

Because of lack of information from industry and inconsistencies in water volume reporting, Ceres’ Western Canada data analysis “represents a very small proportion of the overall activity taking place.” Researchers determined, though, that Alberta fracking operations have started using more “brackish/saline” groundwater instead of freshwater. The report cautions that this practice needs more study “given the potential for brackish water to be used in the future for drinking water” and the fact that withdrawing salty groundwater “can also adversely impact interconnected freshwater resources.”

Although B.C. fracking operations are now mainly in low water stress regions, reduced precipitation and snowpack, low river levels and even drought conditions in some areas – likely because of climate change – raise concerns about the government’s plan to rapidly expand the industry. The report cites a “lack of regulation around groundwater withdrawals” and cumulative impacts on First Nations lands as issues with current fracking.

Ceres’ study only looks at fracking impacts on freshwater supplies, and offers recommendations to reduce those, including recycling water, using brackish or wastewater, strengthening regulations and finding better ways to dispose of fracking wastewater. But the drilling method comes with other environmental problems, from groundwater contamination to massive ecosystem and habitat disruption – even small earth tremors – all done in the name of short-term gain.

It’s important to heed the conclusions and recommendations of this study and others, but given the problems with fracking, and other forms of extraction, we must find ways to control our insatiable fossil fuel demand. That burning these – often wastefully – contributes to climate change, and our methods of extraction exacerbate the problems, should make us take a good look at how we’re treating this planet and everything on it, including ourselves and generations to come. It’s a reminder that we need to conserve energy in every way possible.

In the short term, we must realize that we have better ways to create jobs and build the economy than holding an “everything must go” sale on our precious resources. In the longer term, we must rethink our outdated economic systems, which were devised for times when resources were plentiful and infrastructure was scarce. Our highest priorities must be the air we breathe, the water we drink, the soil that provides food and the biodiversity that keeps us alive and healthy.

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Senior Editor Ian Hanington

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Drought Map USA 20140218

Jacob Bacharach: An Angel of the Lord Appears to a Newspaper Columnist

Essentially agnostic, he believes
the moral universe is of a kind
with the bureaucratic and efficient mind.
His is all incentives and reprieves.
He likes the rich. The poor are mostly thieves.
His paradise is just a well-designed
forced savings scheme, a contract signed,
less what the soul deserves than what it achieves.
If, alone, an angel of God most high
appeared to him beside a shallow stream
while on his way, a man in form, but bright
and terrible, he wouldnt strive; hed try
to reason the miracle down to just a dream,
the honor modest, the pleasure real, but slight.

Link

Poem Tomas Tranströmer

After a Death
Tomas Tranströmer

Once there was a shock
that left behind a long, shimmering comet tail.
It keeps us inside. It makes the TV pictures snowy.
It settles in cold drops on the telephone wires.
One can still go slowly on skis in the winter sun
through brush where a few leaves hang on.
They resemble pages torn from old telephone directories.
Names swallowed by the cold.
It is still beautiful to hear the heart beat
but often the shadow seems more real than the body.
The samurai looks insignificant
beside his armor of black dragon scales.

Ten poems by Tomas Tranströmer
translated by Robert Bly

Is the Army Training to Attack Americans?

It sure looks like it. For it is indeed curious that the Army has built a mock-city that resembles a generic American city. Right down to a church (look at the photo here) and a subway station with DC Metro cars. The cost was $96 million, or about one-quarter the cost of a F-35.

The Army built a fake Iraqi village for training at Ft. Bragg. The Army built a fake Aghani village to train in and the Air Force built one to bomb. Fake Vietnam villages were built at Ft. Lee and Ft. Dix.

Before you go on an anti-Obama rant, this site took six years to plan and build, which implies that the original funds request dates back at least a year or more before that. You might recall who was the president in 2006 through 2008.

Source: http://eb-misfit.blogspot.com/