Mission of Eagle Bluff Continues to Grow

Mission of Eagle Bluff Continues to Grow
By Charlie Warner, Bluff Country Newspapers
Wednesday, October 04, 2017 9:21 AM
(Used with Permission)

Nearly 40 years ago, Eagle Bluff Environmental Learning Center near Lanesboro started out as a bad road, an A-frame house and a dream for Joe Deden.

“It’s come full circle,” Deden said as he provided a personal tour over a rough road on a hog’s back towards another A-frame structure.

Deden was providing a tour of the 150 acres of pristine hardwood forest, native prairie and breathtaking Root River frontage that Eagle Bluff recently purchased from the Allan Gavere estate. As he wove through the hardwood forest, he spoke with passion about this new dream.

“The Gavere family was kind enough to let us utilize much of their property over the years,” the Eagle Bluff executive director noted.

They were very strong supporters of the educational endeavors Deden and his staff were providing to area youth, as well as young minds throughout the U.S. and even internationally.

Over the past decades, Deden estimated Eagle Bluff has had more than a half million students enroll in the myriad of outdoor, conservation and environment classes and workshops.

With the 150 acres Eagle Bluff purchased this past August, Deden envisions more educational opportunities to an even greater number of students.

“Many of our school-aged classes and workshops were designed for elementary and middle school students,” Deden explained. “But with the development of this property, we will be able to offer more to the junior and senior high school students. This will be a remote blufflands eco facility for the older students,” he said, as he pulled into a clearing with an A-frame house, a 150-year-old preserved log cabin and the stone foundation that used to support a pioneer barn. These buildings are located about 1.5 miles from Eagle Bluff’s main campus.

The old pioneer barn was long gone before Deden settled in Fillmore County nearly 40 years ago. But the massive stone foundation remained in place. The aged stones beckoned to Deden to become an educational instrument. It took quite a spell before the usefulness of the massive stone walls came to fruition. But once all the paperwork was completed in August and the 150 acres and the buildings were officially part of Eagle Bluff, Deden moved forward with his vision.

He enlisted the help of nationally-known landscape designer Charles Seha to design a massive fire pit. Seha, who now resides in Fountain, holds a degree in horticulture from the University of Minnesota and a master’s degree in landscape design from the Conway School of Landscape Design. His professional experience includes many fine projects throughout the country. His award-winning work has been published extensively and he was chosen from a field of international specialists to design and implement large scale stone placement at the Quaker Hill Native Plant Garden in New York.

“To have someone of Charles’ expertise, living right here in Fillmore County to design this was fantastic,” Deden said.

“And then to get David Manley of Durango, Colo., to do the stone work has even made this project that much more special,” Deden added.

Manley is known throughout the southwest as one of the premiere stone masons.

The basement floor of the old barn was cleared, the large stones that make up the foundation walls were cleaned and grouted, and Manley spent nearly a month creating the handsome wall and fire pit that Seha had designed.

“This is going to serve as an amphitheater where students can put on plays and skits, a meeting place where students can gather and a learning place where teachers can teach,” Deden continued. “It is so quiet out here. It is so remote. It will be the perfect place for students to get totally back to nature.”

The A-frame house, which is adjacent to the barn foundation, will serve as a kitchen, dining hall and also a small dormitory. “We’ve still got some work to do on the A-frame. But once it’s complete, it will serve a number of purposes,” Deden added.

The buildings are definitely not the only positive aspects of Eagle Bluff’s newest acquisition. The 150 acres that stretch out to a point, with the Root River surrounding three sides, include hardwood forest, natural prairie grasses and native flowers, miles of trails and more than a mile of river frontage. Numerous spots along the river will provide for excellent fishing experiences. And a number of elevated deer stands will be available for young hunters who have enrolled in classes at Eagle Bluff and also have done volunteer work at the facility.

“This is something we’ve been considering and planning for a long time,”Deden admitted. “We just weren’t sure when to pull the trigger. But when the Gavere family offered to sell the property to us for $600,000, we knew it was time.

“So many persons from this area have been so generous with their donations and support,” Deden added. “There is no way we could have done what we’ve done without the tremendous support of so many.”

Santa Rosa, California Before and After Fire 10-9-2017


Photos from LA Times

Map of Santa Rosa -Sacramento -San Francisco

Drought Map for Oct. 3rd 2017

http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/

What he sez…

The Long Night Ahead

FB just declared war against “disruptive” information. In addition to hundreds of new human censors, they are training AI censors capable of identifying and deleting ‘unacceptable’ information found in the discussions of all two billion members in real time. This development highlights what the real danger posed by a socially networked world actually is.

The REAL danger facing a world interconnected by social networking isn’t disruption. As we have seen on numerous occasions, the danger posed by disruptive information and events is fleeting. Disruption, although potentially painful in the short term, doesn’t last, nor is it truly damaging over the long term. In fact, the true danger posed by an internetworked world is just the opposite of disruption.

This danger is an all encompassing online orthodoxy. A sameness of thought and approach enforced by hundreds of millions of socially internetworked adherents. A global orthodoxy that ruthless narrows public thought down to a single, barren, ideological framework. A ruling network that prevents dissent and locks us into stagnation and inevitable failure as it runs afoul of reality and human nature.

This ruling network already exists. It already has millions of online members and it is growing and deepening with each passing day —
extending its tendrils into the media, the civil service, tech companies, and academia. There’s little doubt that over time it will eventually exert decisive influence over the entire government as well.

However, in order to exert authoritarian control over our decision making, it needs control over the flow of information in our society. Merely controlling the online debate is insufficient. For real power, the ruling network needs to control the information flows on our information infrastructure — FB, GGle, and Amzn — and that’s exactly the power it is now getting.

Fortunately, as large and powerful as this network already is, I still believe this dark future is avoidable. We still have a short time before a long night descends across the world.

Sincerely,

John Robb

seen at the new Aldi store

For Sure…

Hmmmm….

Women’s Heart Attack Symptoms Are Different Than Men’s

FEMALE HEART ATTACKS

An ER nurse says this is the best description of a woman having a heart attack that she has ever heard. Please read, pay attention, and SHARE……….

I was aware that female heart attacks are different, but this is the best description I’ve ever read.

Women rarely have the same dramatic symptoms that men have … you know, the sudden stabbing pain in the chest, the cold sweat, grabbing the chest & dropping to the floor that we see in movies. Here is the story of one woman’s experience with a heart attack.

I had a heart attack at about 10:30 PM with NO prior exertion, NO prior emotional trauma that one would suspect might have brought it on. I was sitting all snugly & warm on a cold evening, with my purring cat in my lap, reading an interesting story my friend had sent me, and actually thinking, ‘A-A-h, this is the life, all cozy and warm in my soft, cushy Lazy Boy with my feet propped up.

A moment later, I felt that awful sensation of indigestion, when you’ve been in a hurry and grabbed a bite of sandwich and washed it down with a dash of water, and that hurried bite seems to feel like you’ve swallowed a golf ball going down the esophagus in slow motion and it is most uncomfortable. You realize you shouldn’t have gulped it down so fast and needed to chew it more thoroughly and this time drink a glass of water to hasten its progress down to the stomach. This was my initial sensation–the only trouble was that I hadn’t taken a bite of anything since about 5:00 p.m.

After it seemed to subside, the next sensation was like little squeezing motions that seemed to be racing up my SPINE (hind-sight, it was probably my aorta spasms), gaining speed as they continued racing up and under my sternum (breast bone, where one presses rhythmically when administering CPR).

This fascinating process continued on into my throat and branched out into both jaws. ‘AHA!! NOW I stopped puzzling about what was happening — we all have read and/or heard about pain in the jaws being one of the signals of an MI happening, haven’t we? I said aloud to myself and the cat, Dear God, I think I’m having a heart attack!

I lowered the foot rest dumping the cat from my lap, started to take a step and fell on the floor instead. I thought to myself, If this is a heart attack, I shouldn’t be walking into the next room where the phone is or anywhere else… but, on the other hand, if I don’t, nobody will know that I need help, and if I wait any longer I may not be able to get up in a moment.

I pulled myself up with the arms of the chair, walked slowly into the next room and dialed the Paramedics… I told her I thought I was having a heart attack due to the pressure building under the sternum and radiating into my jaws. I didn’t feel hysterical or afraid, just stating the facts. She said she was sending the Paramedics over immediately, asked if the front door was near to me, and if so, to un-bolt the door and then lie down on the floor where they could see me when they came in.

I unlocked the door and then laid down on the floor as instructed and lost consciousness, as I don’t remember the medics coming in, their examination, lifting me onto a gurney or getting me into their ambulance, or hearing the call they made to St. Jude ER on the way, but I did briefly awaken when we arrived and saw that the radiologist was already there in his surgical blues and cap, helping the medics pull my stretcher out of the ambulance. He was bending over me asking questions (probably something like ‘Have you taken any medications?’) but I couldn’t make my mind interpret what he was saying, or form an answer, and nodded off again, not waking up until the Cardiologist and partner had already threaded the teeny angiogram balloon up my femoral artery into the aorta and into my heart where they installed 2 side by side stints to hold open my right coronary artery.

I know it sounds like all my thinking and actions at home must have taken at least 20-30 minutes before calling the paramedics, but actually it took perhaps 4-5 minutes before the call, and both the fire station and St Jude are only minutes away from my home, and my Cardiologist was already to go to the OR in his scrubs and get going on restarting my heart (which had stopped somewhere between my arrival and the procedure) and installing the stents.

Why have I written all of this to you with so much detail? Because I want all of you who are so important in my life to know what I learned first hand.

1. Be aware that something very different is happening in your body, not the usual men’s symptoms but inexplicable things happening (until my sternum and jaws got into the act). It is said that many more women than men die of their first (and last) MI because they didn’t know they were having one and commonly mistake it as indigestion, take some Maalox or other anti-heartburn preparation and go to bed, hoping they’ll feel better in the morning when they wake up… which doesn’t happen. My female friends, your symptoms might not be exactly like mine, so I advise you to call the Paramedics if ANYTHING is unpleasantly happening that you’ve not felt before. It is better to have a ‘false alarm’ visitation than to risk your life guessing what it might be!

2. Note that I said ‘Call the Paramedics.’ And if you can, take an aspirin. Ladies, TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE!

Do NOT try to drive yourself to the ER – you are a hazard to others on the road.

Do NOT have your panicked husband who will be speeding and looking anxiously at what’s happening with you instead of the road.

Do NOT call your doctor — he doesn’t know where you live and if it’s at night you won’t reach him anyway, and if it’s daytime, his assistants (or answering service) will tell you to call the Paramedics. He doesn’t carry the equipment in his car that you need to be saved! The Paramedics do, principally OXYGEN that you need ASAP. Your Dr. will be notified later.

3. Don’t assume it couldn’t be a heart attack because you have a normal cholesterol count. Research has discovered that a cholesterol elevated reading is rarely the cause of an MI (unless it’s unbelievably high and/or accompanied by high blood pressure). MIs are usually caused by long-term stress and inflammation in the body, which dumps all sorts of deadly hormones into your system to sludge things up in there. Pain in the jaw can wake you from a sound sleep. Let’s be careful and be aware. The more we know the better chance we could survive.

A cardiologist says if everyone who sees this post would Share or re-post, you can be sure that we’ll save at least one life.

*Please be a true friend and SHARE this article to all your friends, women & men too. Most men have female loved ones and could greatly benefit from know this information too!

damn dogz…

Photo by Jon van Cor, with permission