Ardie’s gettin’ her harvest on…

onions drying ardie 20130909

onions drying ardie 20130909

chilis drying ardie 20130909

chilis drying ardie 20130909

Green Fire: Aldo Leopold and a Land Ethic for Our Time

http://youtu.be/4edMwhmRvzo

Lanesboro Rhubarb Fest Sat., June 1st, 2013

Entertainment Schedule

10 a.m. – Festival begins

10 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. Singing of the Rhubarb National Anthem

Rhubarb Run: Welcome/Awards

Bee-Bop-a-Ree-Bop Rhubarb Pie sing-along

Welcome from Bob of Cock-A-Doodle Zoo

Event Leaders – What you need to know about the contests:
Tasting, Games, Minute-to-Win-IT, Pie-making

Event Leaders – What you need to know about the Story Tree
and Fashion Show

10:30 a.m.

Rhubarb Games begin. KTTC’s Morning News Team Jess
Abrahamson and Ted Schmidt throw out the first stalk. Olympics
run continuously 10:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m.

Rhubarb Jugglers Will they juggle flaming rhubarb?

Rhubarb Tasting begins.Taste everything rhubarb from savories to
sweets to drinks. Tasting continues until gone.

Minute-to-Win-it Rhubarb-Chopstick Contest begins. Contest
runs continuously 10:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m.

10:45 a.m. – 11:15 p.m. WALTER BRADLEY AND STEVE ARNOLD
will entertain with song.

11:15 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. RHUBARB SISTERS will sing original
rhubarb songs.

12:00 p.m. – 12:30 p.m. Pie-Making Contest

12:30 p.m. – 1 p.m. TOM SCHRAMM, well-known local artist, will
sing and entertain.

1 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. Pie-Making Contest

1 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. Rhubarb Zumba with Melinda Lutes

1:30 p.m. Prizes awarded for Rhubarb Games, Tasting Contest,
Minute-to-Win-It Rhubarb Chopstick Contest, and Largest Leaf and
Heaviest Stalk Contests. Remember – winners must be present to

take home prizes!

1:45 p.m. – 2 p.m. Rhubarb Fashion Show

2:30 p.m. – 3 p.m. RUTABAGA BROTHERS will sing and entertain.

The Rhubarb Rant will be going on at the top of the hour every hour
during the Festival so tell us your personal Rhubarb story.

Don’t forget to visit The Story Tree, where local storytellers will entertain
at 11:30, 12:30, 1:30 and 2:30.

Cock-A-Doodle-Zoo will run continuously throughout the festival, but for
informational talks about the animals stop there at 11:00
or 1:00.

And check out ridetheskyusa.com to find out about helicopter
rides over Lanesboro departing from our nearby football field.
Their rates and schedule will be available the day of the festival.

CLICK HERE FOR MAP OF FESTIVAL GROUNDS

THANK YOU TO OUR RHUBARB FESTIVAL SPONSORS
Rhubarb Games Sponsors

  • Associated Bank
  • Cottage House Inn
  • Krage Insurance Agency
  • Rhinos Pizza and Subs
  • Scenic Valley Winery
Rhubarb Run Sponsors

  • Road ID
  • Commonweal Theatre Company
  • Artesian Fresh
  • Fillmore County Journal
  • Frank Wright
  • Lanesboro Fire Department
  • Joe Deden / Eagle Bluff Environmental
    Learning Center

Rhubarb Sponsors

  • Commonweal Theatre
  • Inn at Sacred Clay Farm
  • Lanesboro Web Management Group
  • O’Leary’s B & B
  • Ace Communication

LINKS:

Home

Lanesboro – Rhubarb Capital of Minnesota!

“Everything Rhubarb” – The Book

Rhubarb Run

Rhubarb Games

Cock-a-Doodle Zoo

Tasting

Call for Entries

Schedule of Events

Contests

Vendors

Rhubarb Recipes

Science Matters – Bean leaves, bedbugs and biomimicry

David Suzuki Foundation

Bean leaves, bedbugs and biomimicry

bedbugs

Scientists often come up with new discoveries, technologies or theories. But sometimes they rediscover what our ancestors already knew. A couple of recent findings show we have a lot to learn from our forebears � and nature � about bugs.

Modern methods of controlling pests have consisted mainly of poisoning them with chemicals. But that�s led to problems. Pesticides kill far more than the bugs they target, and pollute air, water and soil. As we learned with the widespread use of DDT to control agricultural pests and mosquitoes, chemicals can bioaccumulate, meaning molecules may concentrate hundreds of thousands of times up the food web � eventually reaching people.

As Rachel Carson wrote in her 1962 book Silent Spring, using DDT widely without knowing the full consequences was folly. She showed it was polluting water and killing wildlife, especially birds, and that it could cause cancer in humans. Her book launched the environmental movement but did little to change our overall strategy for dealing with bugs. Although DDT was banned worldwide for agricultural purposes in 2001, the chemical is still used to control insects that spread disease.

Recent research shows that widespread use of pesticides like DDT may have caused us to ignore or forget benign methods of pest control. Because the chemicals were so effective, infestations were reduced and there was little interest in non-toxic methods. But bugs evolve quickly and can become immune to pesticides. That�s true of bedbugs, the now ubiquitous critters that are showing up around the world in homes, hotels, schools, movie theatres � even libraries.

But a method used long ago provides an effective and non-toxic weapon against the pests, according to a U.S. study in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface. The authors looked into the once-common Eastern European practice of spreading bean leaves around a bed to control bedbugs. What they found was fascinating.

�During the night, bed bugs walking on the floor would accumulate on these bean leaves, which were collected and burned the following morning to exterminate the bed bugs. The entrapment of bed bugs by the bean leaves was attributed to the action of microscopic plant hairs (trichomes) on the leaf surfaces that would entangle the legs of the bed bugs,� the scientists, from the University of California, Irvine, and University of Kentucky, wrote.

They discovered that after bugs get caught up in the hooked plant hairs, they struggle to escape, and in the process vulnerable parts of their feet are pierced by the hooks, permanently trapping them. The research focuses on a way to replicate this. �This physical entrapment is a source of inspiration in the development of new and sustainable methods to control the burgeoning numbers of bed bugs,� the researchers wrote, adding that the method �would avoid the problem of pesticide resistance that has been documented extensively for this insect.�

Other research has literally dug up pest control methods that go back millennia. An international team of archeologists recently found evidence that people living in South Africa almost 80,000 years ago made bedding out of insect-repelling plants.

According to the journal Science, the research team found 15 different layers containing bedding made from compacted stems and leaves of sedges and rushes, dating between 77,000 and 38,000 years ago. One layer of leaves was identified as River Wild-quince, which contains �chemicals that are insecticidal, and would be suitable for repelling mosquitoes.� The archeologists also found evidence that people often burned the bedding after use, possibly to remove pests.

These are just two examples of what we can learn from our ancestors and from nature. Because natural systems tend toward balance, the fascinating field of biomimicry has developed to explore what nature can teach us. It�s aimed at finding �sustainable solutions by emulating nature�s time-tested patterns and strategies,� according to the Biomimicry Guild website. �The goal is to create products, processes, and policies � new ways of living � that are well-adapted to life on earth over the long haul.�

Maybe the truest sign of human intelligence is not to learn how we can shoehorn nature into our own agenda, but to see how we can better find our own place in nature.

Written with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Communications Manager Ian Hanington.

Donate Today

Support the David Suzuki Foundation! Our dedicated team ensures that even the smallest contributions go a long way towards protecting nature in Canada.

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Only Elitists Oppose Monsanto’s Global Domination Plan, Says CEO

GAWKER: Monsanto is a $58 billion multinational Pesticide-‘n-Frankenfood corporation that has moved on from selling Agent Orange to its new business of patenting actual seed genomes and then suing farmers who try to grow crops without paying the Monsanto corporation. Who could be opposed to such a thing. Only the elites, clearly.

Nobody really knows what sort of social and environmental consequences might result from the widespread use of genetically engineered Monsanto seeds that are resistant to Monsanto pesticides. I mean, what kind of weirdo would question whether that system has a downside? Latte-swilling, Mark Bittman-worshipping elitists, according to Monsanto CEO Hugh Grant:

There is this strange kind of reverse elitism: If Im going to do this [meaning “not bombard the world with genetically modified seeds and
pesticides and also destroy any farmer who attempts to buck the system”
], then everything else shouldnt exist, Grant said at Monsantos St. Louis headquarters yesterday. There is space in the supermarket shelf for all of us….

And the sad piece of this is, it ends up either or, Grant said. So you get conventional agriculture or broad scale or however you define it, and organic. I think were going to look back on this period and say, How on earth did that ever become the fight that it became.

Alternately, we might look back on this period and say “Yes, May of 2013 is the date to which we need to send our Terminators back in time in order to stop the Monsanto people from distributing their Frankenseeds which will eventually decimate life on earth.” I know, I know typical elitist reaction.

KEY TAKEAWAYS FROM THIS STORY FOR THE BUSY EXECUTIVE: Only elitists care about small farmers; Monsanto CEO Hugh Grant (2012 compensation: $14.4 million) is the voice of the common man.

http://gawker.com/only-elitists-oppose-monsantos-global-domination-plan-506894410

Global Warming Shifts the Earth’s Poles

SLASHDOT: Global warming is changing the location of Earth’s geographic poles, according to a study published this week. Researchers at the University of Texas, Austin, report that increased melting of the Greenland ice sheet and to a lesser degree, ice loss in other parts of the globe helped to shift the North Pole several centimeters east each year since 2005. From 1982 to 2005, the pole drifted southeast towards northern Labrador, Canada, at a rate of about 2 milliarcseconds or roughly 6 centimetres per year. But in 2005, the pole changed course and began galloping east towards Greenland at a rate of more than 7 milliarcseconds per year (abstract). The results suggest that tracking polar shifts can serve as a check on current estimates of ice loss. Scientists can locate the north and south poles to within 0.03 milliarcseconds by using Global Positioning System measurements to determine the angle of Earth’s spin. When mass is lost in one part of a spinning sphere, its spin axis will tilt directly towards the position of the loss exactly as the team observed for Greenland.”

link

Air Tour of Wisconsin Frac Sand Mines – Red Wing Republican Eagle 5-12-13

A bird’s-eye view of mining

While debate over mining policy continues in St. Paul, Sen. Matt Schmit chartered flights out of Red Wing Regional Airport Friday for reporters to get a bird’s-eye view of the impact frac sand mines are having across the river in Wisconsin.

By: Michael Brun, The Republican Eagle
[see http://www.republican-eagle.com/event/article/id/88068/%5D

 
  • PHOTO: Hager City
image
Although a mining moratorium remains in place in Goodhue County, an open-pit silica mine is operational just across the border near Hager City. — photo by Michael Brun/Republican Eagle
  • PHOTO: Mine
  • PHOTO: Plant

While debate over mining policy continues in St. Paul, Sen. Matt Schmit chartered flights out of Red Wing Regional Airport Friday for reporters to get a bird’s-eye view of the impact frac sand mines are having across the river in Wisconsin.

The roughly hourlong flight, piloted by Jim McIlrath from Frontenac in his homemade, single-engine plane, toured more than a dozen mines dotting the Wisconsin countryside around Menomonie and Eau Claire.

“We have an opportunity to avoid the perils of western Wisconsin,” wrote Schmit in a column Feb. 22 after attending a joint meeting of the Senate and House environmental committees regarding frac sand mining. “Let’s not repeat their mistakes.”

The Red Wing Democrat has been an active proponent in the Senate for increased regulation for frac sand mining in Minnesota.

He has been involved with a number of mining-related bills in his inaugural legislative session, including sponsoring an amendment to an environmental bill that would prohibit frac sand mining within a mile of state trout streams in southeastern Minnesota. Continue reading

Basketed Lettuce …

Gift from Ardie… comes in pretty handy when you have to bring ’em in every night to keep ’em from freezing… temperature got down to 27 F early this AM in Red Wing, May 12th 2013…

Lettuce w Flash

Lettuce w Flash

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Lettuce Window Light

Burning Off Invasive Grasses

An Annual Ritual At The Edge of The Great American Desert

Burning off, as much as possible, the invasive grasses so the navite prairie species can, someday, get re-established…

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Carbon Dioxide at NOAA’s Mauna Loa Observatory reaches new milestone Tops 400 ppm

Carbon Dioxide at NOAA’s Mauna Loa Observatory reaches new milestone: Tops 400 ppm

May 10, 2013 Contact: John Ewald, 240-429-6127

Mona Loa Observatory After Snowstorm

Mona Loa Observatory After Snowstorm

On May 9, the daily mean concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere of Mauna Loa, Hawaii, surpassed 400 parts per million (ppm) for the first time since measurements began in 1958. Independent measurements made by both NOAA and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography have been approaching this level during the past week. It marks an important milestone because Mauna Loa, as the oldest continuous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement station in the world, is the primary global benchmark site for monitoring the increase of this potent heat-trapping gas.

Carbon dioxide pumped into the atmosphere by fossil fuel burning and other human activities is the most significant greenhouse gas (GHG) contributing to climate change. Its concentration has increased every year since scientists started making measurements on the slopes of the Mauna Loa volcano more than five decades ago. The rate of increase has accelerated since the measurements started, from about 0.7 ppm per year in the late 1950s to 2.1 ppm per year during the last 10 years.

“That increase is not a surprise to scientists,” said NOAA senior scientist Pieter Tans, with the Global Monitoring Division of NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratoryin Boulder, Colo. “The evidence is conclusive that the strong growth of global CO2 emissions from the burning of coal, oil, and natural gas is driving the acceleration.” Continue reading