mmmm ummmm

slurp….

thanks Ardie

Didn’t the USA used to be winners ?

Zombie Endocrine Disruptors Threaten Life

Many U.S. ranchers implant cattle with the synthetic androgen trenbolone acetate to beef them up, but concerns have been raised that its metabolites leach into streams and ponds, disrupting endocrine systems of aquatic life. Sunlight was though to permanently degrade such metabolites but a study shows that the degradation products can revert at night, zombielike, back into the endocrine-disrupting metabolites. The same could be true of metabolites of other hormones that make their way into the environment.

http://www.sciencemag.org/content/341/6153/1441.summary

Ardie’s Grapes for Syrup

Gene therapy gives mice broad protection to pandemic flu strains, including 1918 flu

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130529144242.htm

California Bill Would Mandate Open Access To Publicly Funded Research – Slashdot

“This week, advocates of open access to publicly funded research are keeping an eye on California’s Taxpayer Access to Publicly Funded Research Act (AB 609), which could soon find its way to the California State Senate. The bill requires the final copy of any peer-reviewed research funded by California tax dollars to be made publicly accessible within 12 months of publication. If passed, the legislation would become the first state-level law mandating this kind of access. Opensource.com is featuring a collection of articles on open access publishing, which you can read while you await the verdict on AB 609.”
http://science.slashdot.org/story/13/05/30/1347248/california-bill-would-mandate-open-access-to-publicly-funded-research

The Black Death Is Doing Fine – And Becoming Resistant

from Contagions

Yersinia pestis-plague-black death“Tibet-Qinghai plateau region is where Yersinia pestis originated and the region where subsequent pandemics arose, I think its time to look more closely at regional outbreaks and case studies.

In this region, the marmot (Marmota himalayana) is the primary reservoir for Yersinia pestis. This large communal burrowing rodent is hunted by local Tibetan tribesmen for both meat and pelts. Butchering marmots has long been considered a risk factor for contracting plague via their fleas, aerosols or skin abrasions. To investigate the exposure of marmot hunters to plague, Chinese epidemiologists collected serum from 120 Qinghai villagers, 68 male hunters and 52 female family members, along with 120 negative controls from the non-endemic area of Beijing. None of the villagers or controls reported having a fever within the last two years.

The results are eye-opening and illustrates the importance of occupational exposure. Over a third of the male villagers had an antibody response to Yersinia pestis. Only 2% of their female family members produced an antibody response. Wether two fever-free years are enough time to determine if they had symptomatic plague in the past is an open question. Their letter to Emerging Infectious Diseases does not provide much information on the test subject’s histories or oral reports. [see more here LINK]”