READING BY WRITERS MAY 20th 2014

READING BY WRITERS TUESDAY MAY 20, 7:00 p.m. to When We Finish.

Violinist Mary Scallen and Flutist Jim Miller perform from 7:00 to 7:30 to welcome the audience.

At 7:30 Featured readers are:

CASS DALGLISH, poet and fiction writer, wrote television news and documentaries as a broadcast journalist. Her books include NIN, Spinsters Ink; SWEETGRASS, a Minnesota Book Award finalist; and HUMMING THE BLUES, Calyx Books. Her book length prose poem is the jazz interpretation of the Sumerian cuneiform signs in Enheduanna’s Song to Inanna, Ancient Iraq, 2350 BCE. Cass was an invited speaker at the post museum session of conference Innana – Live at the British Museum in London. The recipient of many fine awards, she serves as Director of the Augsburg College Creative Writing Program.

MARY ANN GROSSMANN began her career at United Press International in Minneapolis, and moved to Dispatch-Pioneer Press, where she has been women’s editor, fashion editor, women’s columnist, assistant features editor, and books editor since 1983. Recipient of Minnesota Book Awards KAY SEXTON AWARD and TWIN CITIES NEWSPAPER GUILD PAGE ONE AWARD, past president of MINNESOTA REVIEWS, and editor with late husband of four MINNESOTA and WISCONSIN ALMANACS. A life-long Saint Paulite, Mary Ann lives in Cherokee Heights in a money-pit Victorian house that she says “…will keep me at my desk until I die”. She adds, “I have been working at the newspaper so long that everyone in Saint Paul looks familiar to me.”

MIRIAM KARMEL, widely published in numerous publications including BELLEVIEW LITERATY REVIEW; WATER-STONE REVIEW; PEARL DUST & FIRE, PASSAGER; and JEWISH WOMEN’S LITERARY ANNUAL. She is the recipient of MINNESOTA MONTHLY Tamarack Award for her short story, THE QUEEN OF LOVE. Her story THE KING OF MARVIN GARDENS, was included in Milkweed Edition’s FICTION ON A STICK. Her first novel, BEING ESTHER, Milkweed Editions, was published in 2013.

JEANNE LUTZ, poet, grew up on a dairy farm in southern Minnesota, attended the National University of Ireland, Galway, earned her B.A. in English from St Catherine University, spent two years in Tokyo, and lives in Saint Paul. Finalist in the 2013 LOFT MENTOR SERIES FOR POETRY, her work can be seen regularly at LIEF MAGAZINE. Poet Ethan McKiernan says, “Jeanne is a poet of comic irony and a ferociously large imagination. Her poems gallop with inventiveness, inviting the reader to ride along……we leave her work hungry for more.”

MARGARET SHRYER, whose first play KATHARINA von BORA, Runaway Nun, was published in 2013. She performed this one woman show about the wife of Martin Luther at the 2013 Minneapolis Fringe Festival and at Raven Theatre in Chicago in April, 2014. She continues to meet with her writing group (USSS) and is currently researching the life of Abigail Adams. Stay tuned.

FAITH SULLIVAN is the author of eight novels, among them THE CAPE ANN and GARDENIAS. The eighth work, GOOD NIGHT MR. WODEHOUSE, will be published by Milkweed Editions in 2015. Sullivan is also the author of countless brilliant articles and essays. Faith serves on the Board of the Loft Literary Center, which she calls her “home away from home.”

MAY LEE-YANG, playwright, poet, prose writer, performance artist, whose theater-based work includes CONFESSIONS OF A LAZY HMONG; TEN REASOS WHY I’D BE BAD PORN STAR; STIR-FRIED POP CULTURE, and more. Her work has been produced by Mu Performing Arts, Intermedia Arts, MN Fringe Festival, National Asian American Theater Festival, and more. She is the author of the children’s book THE IMAGINARY DAY, MN Humanities Center, and has been widely published in numerous prestigious anthologies. She has received grants and fellowships from the Minnesota State Arts Board, the National Performance Network, the Midwestern Voices and Visions Residency Award, the Playwright Center, the Loft Literary Center, and is 2011 Bush Leadership Fellowship winner.

Readings last just about one hour. Readers will bring books – we have a great book sales table – and will autograph. .

Every Third Tuesday Public At Saint Paul presents: Saint Paul Poet Laureate CAROL CONNOLLY Hosts READING BY WRITERS – free and open to everyone – at the historic University Club Saint Paul 420 Summit Avenue.

Members and Non members are welcome and invited for the optional 5:00 dinner, not connected to the performance, but reservations are necessary – 651-22-1751

Bar is open before, during and after the 7:30 reading…

John Tottenham REGRETS

REGRETS

I don’t understand people
who claim that they have no regrets in life;
who insist, out of gratitude, pride or ignorance,
that they wouldn’t want to change a thing.
My life is a raging river of regret, flowing
into a sea of shame. There is very little
I wouldn’t do differently if given a second chance.
I always knew I’d end up feeling this way:
It was a setup. Regret was something
I worked towards, something I felt I had to earn.
And now, naturally, I regret that too.

After many years of resistance, John Tottenham finally sold out to the lucrative, fast-paced world of poetry. He is the author of The Inertia Variations, an epic cycle on the subject of work-avoidance, indolence and failure. His final collection of poetry, Antiepithalamia & Other Poems of Regret and Resentment, a sequence of mean-spirited love poems with particular respect paid to the institution of marriage, was published by Penny-Ante Press in October 2012.

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He is also an old-fashioned paint and brushes man, whose paintings and drawings have been exhibited at galleries in Los Angeles and New York. His last solo show was at the Rosamund Felsen gallery in July, 2012.

http://johntottenham.com/2012/11/10/regrets/

Good Friday Blue

Emilio DeGrazia…

After catechism, Communion, Confirmation,
The hardening of trust into truth,
We expected rain Good Friday afternoons.

No baseball then, no playing in streets,
No kicking the can, no
Playing robbers or war
Those painful hours from noon to three.

In those days we always saw the evidence: Rain,
A steady stream of punishment,
The Holy Spirit’s drizzle descending like ash,
Or wayward bursts, big as water balloons,
Dropped from passing clouds
Flying in formation overhead,
A certain proof of God.

Today, that April day again
When the only gospel is the same old news,
The dying still goes on.
But the sky is faultlessly blue,
An Easter sky ahead of its times,
One more kind of progress to endure.
In such skies one famous old death
Happened once and for all,
But new ones everywhere provide
Too much cause to agonize.

Live from Golgotha: The Gospel according to Gore Vidal

St. Paul freely improvises his tales as he evangelizes. “‘All things are contained within the single mind of Onespc_vidal True God in His three aspects.’ Saint Paul could dispense this sort of smooth bullshit while taking apart and reassembling a Holy Rolodex machine,” Timothy relates as he witnesses St. Paul in action. Paul speaks in “ye olde” when he quotes the voluminous Christ. Timothy remarks that when Saul of Tarsus meets the Christ vidal-cover-live from golgothaghost, he converts to a religion that Saul/Paul himself had not yet founded. People are consistently disappointed to learn that Christ weighed 400 lbs. and spoke with a lisp. “Why doth thou persecute-eth me-th?” There is an interesting plot twist when Judas is mistaken for Christ and almost crucified. It seems that the “real Christ” was a militant Zionist, and Paul’s golden-rule Christianity an improvisation. Paul journeys from town to town raising money and founding churches, adding to his Holy rolodex, and tap-dancing. Cameos from celebrities such as Nero, Petronius, and Shirley MacLaine are interspersed throughout Timothy’s odyssey from CE 33 to CE 96.”
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Live_from_Golgotha:_The_Gospel_according_to_Gore_Vidal

BUY THE BOOK

Foraging for Wood on the Mountain

Jack Gilbert 1925 – 2012

The wild up here is not creatures, wooded,
tangled wild. It is absence wild.
Barren, empty, stone wild. Worn-away wild.
Only the smell of weeds and hot air.
But a place where differences are clear.
Between the minds severity and its harshness.
Between honesty and the failure of belief.
A man said no person is educated who knows
only one language, for he cannot distinguish
between his thought and the English version.
Up here he is translated to a place where it is
possible to discriminate between age and sorrow.

 

– from The Great Fires: Poems, 1982-1992 by Jack Gilbert

College “Sports” Emilio DeGrazia

PRIVATIZE

“Have we gone insane?” is what a Minnesota cattle farmer probably not much interested in March Madness asked. His question was a reaction to the news that Jerry Kill, the University of Minnesota football coach, had his $1,2000,000 salary increased by an extra $2,100,000, plus perks, for guiding the Gophers to eight wins and five losses during the 2013 season. Maybe winning isn’t everything. It certainly isn’t for everyone.
No doubt Coach Kill is a nice enough guy and competent enough at what he does. And he didn’t complain about the salary bump he received. Ohio State’s Urban Meyer makes $4,600,000, plus perks, and he’s in the same league.
It’s hard to imagine anyone in his or her right mind seriously believing that the NCAA Division One big money sports––football, basketball, hockey––have anything but a tendril connection to a university’s higher education missions. There are several fine student-athletes who get excellent grades while working very hard at their sports. The graduation rate for athletes and non-athletes is comparable, though the amount of money it takes to get a student-athlete a degree is hidden in a murk of red ink. But it seems obvious that the hazards of football seem well out of line with what health educators teach, and that at the D-1 level students need to learn how to keep their classes from interfering with their serious sports jobs.
Student-athletes must suspect they’re part of an entertainment industry. Coach Kill was honest enough to fess up to it, and he left the impression that as a newcomer to the industry his new salary represents his fair market value.
But some of the people responsible for overseeing the numbers at D-1 higher educational institutions maybe need some refresher courses in elementary arithmetic. Only 23 of the 228 NCAA D-1 sports programs generated enough income to cover expenses in 2012, and 16 of the 23 winners received subsidies by way of student fees and university and state funds. The other 205 were losers, as were the donors and tax payers who picked up the tab. Losing seasons are a financial trend for most NCAA schools.
Meanwhile, the NCAA as an organization quietly showed a profit of $71,000,000 for 2012. Rather noisily state governments try to figure out how to pay their bills.
It’s time to turn these big-time sports teams into what they really are: Businesses. Because I’m addicted to thrift I think they should get off an unsustainable welfare system. Privatize them.
I’m not a spoil-sport. I know that millions love to cheer for the logos and colors on the laundry they love. Big time sports are major rituals that stimulate a deep need for community identity. As a kid in Michigan I grew up loving the Spartans and Wolverines, and I got my graduate degrees as a Buckeye at Ohio State, and when I married a Nebraska woman I learned to love Cornhuskers, and because I pay taxes in Wisconsin I have a Badger in me, and because my daughter is a student at the University of Iowa I’m a Hawkeye too. As a Minnesotan I’m a devout Gopher, for reasons I can’t fully explain. I want everyone to win.
A lot of people are not ready to give up big-time collegiate sports yet, even when they go home from a game losers again.
Turning big-time collegiate sports programs into for-profit enterprises should especially appeal to fiscal conservatives who have a passion to cut taxes and privatize the public schools.
Here’s my business plan: Turn the big-time intercollegiate sports over to private entrepreneurs willing to invest in new business ventures. Let entrepreneurs, rather than participating schools, run them as private for-profit businesses. They buy the naming, branding, and concessions rights from universities. They lease the cheerleaders and marching bands. They lease university facilities, or construct their own. They pay all travel and advertising expenses. They cut their own TV and bowl game deals. They hire the coaches and other managers. They pay the bills and enjoy the profits that come rolling in. Private investors could get involved, and maybe Wall Street too.
Could these new business enterprises––let’s call them clubs––still be considered intercollegiate sports? A few rules would give them permission to say yes. The players would be recruited from the pool of graduating high school student-athletes, as they are now. They would have five years to fulfill four years of service on the playing field. They would be required to establish student identity by taking at least one class at the university whose logo they wear during games.
Nothing much would change, except the ownership of teams, business plans, and bookkeeping responsibilities. Gopher fans could continue to cheer for players wearing Gopher uniforms, and everyone could continue to have a good time.
Currently there’s some talk about student-athletes unionizing. That’s an issue players could work out with management, maybe after some discussion about salaries for coaches and club executives. Clubs, as free enterprise businesses, could make millions, or not. And if not, owners could downsize or apply other lean strategies.
Already there are rumors about the University of Minnesota needing $190,000,000 for improved practice facilities. Experts feel that the UM will not be able to compete without the upgrades. They’re very probably right. Why would an eighteen year-old super athlete high school recruit want anything but the latest and best high-tech facilities? Why not go to Penn State instead?
Tim Dahlberg, sports writer for the AP, says, “That’s the way things are in big-time college athletics, where the rich are getting richer. Hard not to profit when the labor is free.” Hard not to profit when public university athletic programs are bailed out by student fees and tax dollars.
I’m with the cattle farmer from western Minnesota. Why play this game? “Have we gone insane?”
Four or five times a year I get a call from sweet-voiced students at my alma mater Ohio State. They want me to send OSU money because there’s never enough to go around. I plead with them to spread the word: For starters, I tell the voices on the line, cut the coaching salaries in half. Call me again after you begin there.=

Humanity

Gregory_Corso

 

 

 

Gregory Corso
b. March 26, 1930

What simple profundities
What profound simplicities
To sit down among the trees
and breathe with them
in murmur brool and breeze

And how can I trust them
who pollute the sky
with heavens
the below with hells

Well, humankind,
Im part of you
and so my son

but neither of us
will believe
your big sad lie

[via wood s lot]